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This marigold Dragon and Strawberry bowl was made by the Fenton Art Glass Company in the early 1900’s. This is not a common bowl, but the iridescence is top notch on this. That is what keeps people bidding on this beautiful glass. Finding a piece with super iridescence is the way to follow your heart.

Feel free to share your favorite Fenton piece or your favorite bowl on our International Carnival Glass Association Facebook page in the comments. We love to see those beautiful colors. See MoreSee Less

This marigold Dragon and Strawberry bowl was made by the Fenton Art Glass Company in the early 1900s. This is not a common bowl, but the iridescence is top notch on this. That is what keeps people bidding on this beautiful glass. Finding a piece with super iridescence is the way to follow your heart.

Feel free to share your favorite Fenton piece or your favorite bowl on our International Carnival Glass Association Facebook page in the comments. We love to see those beautiful colors.

 

Comment on Facebook

couldnt decide what my favorite bowl is that I haven’t already posted so here are a couple of more unusual ones. ragged Robin in blue and Hearts and Vines in blue

Holly

Just picked up a green dragon and strawberry bowl at woody auction Aug 18th

This is my blue Vintage Fernery .

Closely followed by my Blue Hearts & Vine Plate.

Barb it looks beautiful in my cabinet don’t you think

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There are mug collectors in the carnival glass scheme of collecting. This aqua opal Dandelion mug is on many of their wish lists. This was made by Northwood in the early 1900’s. Northwood also made a Dandelion water set, but it is really a completely different pattern.

These names were given to the patterns many years after they were manufactured. Marion Hurting and Rose Presznick hand drew the patterns or had help in hand drawing them and then named them. If you have a chance to buy their books, it would be interesting for you to enjoy.

If you have a favorite mug or two or a Dandelion water pitcher or set, share them here on the International Carnival Glass Association Facebook page in the comment section below. We would love to see them. See MoreSee Less

There are mug collectors in the carnival glass scheme of collecting. This aqua opal Dandelion mug is on many of their wish lists. This was made by Northwood in the early 1900s. Northwood also made a Dandelion water set, but it is really a completely different pattern. 

These names were given to the patterns many years after they were manufactured. Marion Hurting and Rose Presznick hand drew the patterns or had help in hand drawing them and then named them. If you have a chance to buy their books, it would be interesting for you to enjoy. 

If you have a favorite mug or two or a Dandelion water pitcher or set, share them here on the International Carnival Glass Association Facebook page in the comment section below. We would love to see them.

 

Comment on Facebook

Singing Birds mug in Aqua Opal.

What I would love to find is a blue Fisherman’s Mug. Doty lists 3 of them having sold in the past 20 years, but in 40 years of collecting, I have never seen one.

Singing birds mug in amethyst

Thanks, Cherie, this looks very pretty. It’s a great pattern.

Its definitely on my list

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This is a great piece of green Fenton Art Glass from the early 1900’s. It is called Concord – for the grapes of course. It looks a lot like a Fenton Vintage bowl, but it has that netting look covering the front. Vintage doesn’t have that. Perhaps this started out as a Vintage bowl, and the designers thought, my that would look prettier if it had more to the design. That’s just a theory, of course. At any rate, just think of all the work that the mold maker had to do to make this much detail.

Do you have a Concord bowl or a Vintage bowl or a beautiful piece of green Fenton glass. If so, share it here on the International Carnival Glass Association Facebook page in the comment section below. See MoreSee Less

This is a great piece of green Fenton Art Glass from the early 1900s. It is called Concord - for the grapes of course. It looks a lot like a Fenton Vintage bowl, but it has that netting look covering the front. Vintage doesnt have that. Perhaps this started out as a Vintage bowl, and the designers thought, my that would look prettier if it had more to the design. Thats just a theory, of course. At any rate, just think of all the work that the mold maker had to do to make this much detail.

Do you have a Concord bowl or a Vintage bowl or a beautiful piece of green Fenton glass. If so, share it here on the International Carnival Glass Association Facebook page in the comment section below.

 

Comment on Facebook

A Really Stunning Bowl!!

Just beautiful!

Vintage bowl in a strange blue. The Fenton Brothers confirmed that they don’t know exactly what to call it.

Stuning!

Mother called this “Thistle Dish”. Haven’t a clue of what it really is. Just cherished.

Here is my version of a Concord green, a 3 and 1 edge. This one was originally in the Fenton Museum and one of Frank Fenton’s favorites. I am surprised at how many of these have the blue highlights.

Our Emerald Green Concord plate.

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