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Please browse our site to learn more about the beauty of classic (or “old”) carnival glass. If you would like to learn more about our membership, or would like to join our organization, please click here.

Fenton could get the iridescence right on many pieces. They did on this blue Peacock and Grape bowl from the classic period of carnival glass manufacturing. If you like peacock patterns, then this might be one of the more affordable pieces to collect, and…you can’t beat the iridescence. Good luck on your carnival glass hunting. See MoreSee Less

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Anna Stewart Sprague, Mary Ann Williams and 46 others like this

Pat BoyerPretty

3 days ago   ·  1

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Liz HipkissLove it :)

3 days ago   ·  1

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Anna Stewart SpragueThat bowl is so awesome!!!

1 day ago   ·  1

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Ron Smith recently had surgery on his back. He is holding his favorite Good Luck bowl for luck with the surgery. Vickie reports that the surgery went well, so the bowl seemed to bring him the good luck needed. We hope for continued good recovery. Permission was granted to use his photo. See MoreSee Less

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Melissa SpanglerHere’s to a speedy recovery and some Good Luck!

4 days ago   ·  1

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Jan Miller BochinskiGood Luck and best wishes from Chicago!

4 days ago   ·  1

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Paulette FortuneWhatever it takes!!

4 days ago   ·  1

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Steven C. LindquistSuper news.

4 days ago   ·  1

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Carol CurtisGlad surgery went well. Hope to hear from you and Vicki soon.

4 days ago   ·  1

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Reginald DunhamSpeedy recovery…

2 days ago   ·  1

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International Carnival Glass Association added 2 new photos.

This beautiful bowl looks like it is marigold from the top of the bowl, but you have to look at the true color of the glass on the bottom of the bowl. It is powder blue with a marigold iridescence. This is another Chrysanthemum bowl by Fenton, but unlike the green one pictured below, this bowl has no feet and is between eight and nine inches in diameter. The fun of finding a somewhat common piece in a different color is one of the fun things about collecting carnival glass. Give it a try. See MoreSee Less

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