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This marigold Trout and Fly bowl was made by the Millersburg Glass Company in the early 1900’s. They were known for their radium finish, which this piece has.It has a crimped three-in-one edge. This is a collectible piece for carnival glass fanatics or people who like fishing or wildlife. It is a fairly affordable piece. See MoreSee Less

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Many people are not into the peach opal color of carnival glass, but sometimes it just cannot be beat. This Dugan Ski Star basket has fantastic opal and iridescence. Peach opal like other opal colors was produced with bone ash in the batch. An extra step had to be taken with returning the piece to the oven to draw out the bone ash to make the opal edge on the otherwise clear piece. Iridescence was applied after that. See MoreSee Less

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Fran├žoise Chartrand, Janet Borden and 20 others like this

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Anna Stewart SpragueLove this!!!!

4 days ago   ·  1

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Elizabeth Mitchellso pretty! my dad used to win carnival glass for my grandma at the local fairs, wish I had some of those pieces now!

3 days ago   ·  1

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Tim Scott ReaburnI have always really liked peach opal – it was some of the earliest carnival glass that I purchased, not least of all because I could afford it. Here is a Fanciful ruffled bowl with lovely color.

3 days ago   ·  5

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Tim Scott ReaburnAgain, one of my early pieces – what’s not to love with the pattern (Folding Fan) and the pretty colors on the peach opal?

3 days ago   ·  5

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If you like collecting tumblers, this would be a rather scarce tumbler, but in a price range that many would be able to buy. It is a marigold Cherry and Cable tumbler made by Northwood. It was probably one of the earlier patterns that Northwood made in carnival glass because the pattern was also used in crystal glass before the carnival era. See MoreSee Less

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Keystone Carnival Glass Club, David Oberman and 17 others like this

Art ChapmanExcellent piece that I would love to have!

6 days ago

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