WELCOME TO THE ICGA WEBSITE.
Please browse our site to learn more about the beauty of classic (or “old”) carnival glass. If you would like to learn more about our membership, or would like to join our organization, please click here.

The U.S. Glass Company is credited with manufacturing the Palm Beach pattern. Above is the water pitcher/cider pitcher that was made in this pattern. It is white, but has very nice iridescence as you can see in the photo. Usually I photograph white on black or dark fabric, but this was on a white background and it still shows the colors of the iridescence. This is a short and stout pitcher. It is heavy enough without the liquid refreshment, so would be hard to handle when filled. There is a fairly large array of pieces that were produced in this pattern, but usually only white, marigold, or honey amber were the colors produced. There are a few exceptions to the rule, so be on the lookout for those other colors. See MoreSee Less

The U.S. Glass Company is credited with manufacturing the Palm Beach pattern. Above is the water pitcher/cider pitcher that was made in this pattern. It is white, but has very nice iridescence as you can see in the photo. Usually I photograph white on black or dark fabric, but this was on a white background and it still shows the colors of the iridescence. This is a short and stout pitcher. It is heavy enough without the liquid refreshment, so would be hard to handle when filled. There is a fairly large array of pieces that were produced in this pattern, but usually only white, marigold, or honey amber were the colors produced. There are a few exceptions to the rule, so be on the lookout for those other colors.

Another scarce piece in carnival glass is this covered powder dish in the Banded Portland pattern. There are a few other pieces known in carnival glass in this pattern, but they certainly aren’t plentiful. Most of the pieces were not iridized with lots of color and this leads to speculation that these possibly were amber watered glass, which meant that the pieces were left in hot springs, with certain elements present in the water until they reached a certain degree of iridescence. At any rate, these little oddities are fun to collect, and they certainly don’t take up much space when displayed. See MoreSee Less

Another scarce piece in carnival glass is this covered powder dish in the Banded Portland pattern. There are a few other pieces known in carnival glass in this pattern, but they certainly arent plentiful. Most of the pieces were not iridized with lots of color and this leads to speculation that these possibly were amber watered glass, which meant that the pieces were left in hot springs, with certain elements present in the water until they reached a certain degree of iridescence. At any rate, these little oddities are fun to collect, and they certainly dont take up much space when displayed.

Comment on Facebook

Really nice..

"What’s that?" you say. "It looks like a common every day Orange Tree creamer." It is an Orange Tree creamer from the breakfast set, but…it is not just marigold. Look around the top rim and you will see it is peach opal. Some of that bone ash may have been left at the bottom of a batch when a worker pulled out some molten glass to place in the mold for the creamer. When it was reheated, the bone ash made it opal at the top.

It’s always a good thing to look closely at the color when you see a piece of glass. You might be surprised to find an unusual color or an opal edge. That is one of the fun parts of collecting carnival glass. See MoreSee Less

Whats that? you say. It looks like a common every day Orange Tree creamer. It is an Orange Tree creamer from the breakfast set, but...it is not just marigold. Look around the top rim and you will see it is peach opal. Some of that bone ash may have been left at the bottom of a batch when a worker pulled out some molten glass to place in the mold for the creamer. When it was reheated, the bone ash made it opal at the top.

Its always a good thing to look closely at the color when you see a piece of glass. You might be surprised to find an unusual color or an opal edge. That is one of the fun parts of collecting carnival glass.

Load more