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Sometimes a very plain pattern can really catch your eye. The iridescence on this marigold Three-in-One bowl caught our attention. It is even better in person than this photo shows. This was made by the Imperial Glass Company in the early 1900’s. It probably was made as a utilitarian piece, meant to be used. Just think of your Thanksgiving meal with this large deep bowl filled with mashed potatoes or dressing.

Do you have a piece of carnival glass that you could use for Thanksgiving? Would you share it in the comment section below for all our International Carnival Glass Association members to enjoy? See MoreSee Less

Sometimes a very plain pattern can really catch your eye. The iridescence on this marigold Three-in-One bowl caught our attention. It is even better in person than this photo shows. This was made by the Imperial Glass Company in the early 1900s. It probably was made as a utilitarian piece, meant to be used. Just think of your Thanksgiving meal with this large deep bowl filled with mashed potatoes or dressing.

Do you have a piece of carnival glass that you could use for Thanksgiving? Would you share it in the comment section below for all our International Carnival Glass Association members to enjoy?

 

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Here’s my three-in-one green toothpick.

Fenton thistle banana boat with water lily and cattails exterior in blue

3 days ago

International Carnival Glass Association

Western Daisy is an exterior pattern on bowls made by the Dugan-Diamond company in the early 1900’s. This pattern isn’t found very often. Sometimes it is found with the Soutache interior pattern. As you can see, it is an unusual shape with those four points pulled out with four rounded portions between. Sometimes the points have not been pulled out so that it is a more normal looking bowl. This is peach opal. The white on the edges was in the making of the glass. Bone ash was added to the glass batch and when this was reheated after being removed from the mold, the white coloring formed along the edges.

Most peach opal was made by the Dugan-Diamond glass company, but there are a few pattens that you can find from other companies that made peach opal.

Do you have a favorite piece of peach opal that you would like to include in the comments below on our ICGA page for all of us to see? We would be glad to see them. See MoreSee Less

Western Daisy is an exterior pattern on bowls made by the Dugan-Diamond company in the early 1900s. This pattern isnt found very often. Sometimes it is found with the Soutache interior pattern. As you can see, it is an unusual shape with those four points pulled out with four rounded portions between. Sometimes the points have not been pulled out so that it is a more normal looking bowl. This is peach opal. The white on the edges was in the making of the glass. Bone ash was added to the glass batch and when this was reheated after being removed from the mold, the white coloring formed along the edges. 

Most peach opal was made by the Dugan-Diamond glass company, but there are a few pattens that you can find from other companies that made peach opal.

Do you have a favorite piece of peach opal that you would like to include in the comments below on our ICGA page for all of us to see? We would be glad to see them.Image attachment

 

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Dugan Wishbone & Spades 5” berry bowl

Whimseys – in carnival glass a whimsey is something that has been fashioned from a production line item. In the case of this Northwood ice blue Grape and Cable whimsey pin dish we know it was shaped from a punch cup when cup came from the mold and was still malleable. The finisher would take it and use a wooden paddle to flare out the edges. Some people called these whimseys lunch box pieces. In other words, they thought the workers were carrying out a piece they made in their lunch boxes.

Do you have a whimsey you would like to share? Please do so in the comment section below this post on the International Carnival Glass Association Facebook page. There are many different whimseys out there but in a limited amount of each item. See MoreSee Less

Whimseys - in carnival glass a whimsey is something that has been fashioned from a production line item. In the case of this Northwood ice blue Grape and Cable whimsey pin dish we know it was shaped from a punch cup when cup came from the mold and was still malleable. The finisher would take it and use a wooden paddle to flare out the edges. Some people called these whimseys lunch box pieces. In other words, they thought the workers were carrying out a piece they made in their lunch boxes.

Do you have a whimsey you would like to share? Please do so in the comment section below this post on the International Carnival Glass Association Facebook page. There are many different whimseys out there but  in a limited amount of each item.

 

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Fenton fine rib footed whimsey vase in blue

Dugan circle scroll JIP hat in purple

There is only one Memphis tumbler known in a shiny green. Yet here is a marigold ruffled hat whimsied from the tumbler mold. Where are those Memphis tumblers by Northwood? Yes, the hat is signed N.

Here’s a Fenton Grape and Cable 7” plate with the sides turned up, no doubt it’s one of those pieces that classify as rare but who cares.

Cuspidors.

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